In the beginning there was Netflix. And it was good. Then Amazon Prime Video popped up, and it too was good. Then the main terrestrial, cable and satellite broadcasters got involved too. Then Apple decided to throw its hat into the ring, entering the arena with no back catalogue and just a handful of original titles.

Now a new (but old) kid has arrived and it’s looking to school the old timers on how a streaming service should work. Welcome Disney+ UK.

When Netflix launched, it effectively laid down what other video streaming services would eventually do themselves. Initially offering content from other companies, Netflix started commissioning their own original programs – starting with the excellent Lilyhammer (sic). Netflix added UltraHD content too, but held out for the longest time in offering downloadable content to tables and mobile phones. The honour of offering downloads goes to Amazon’s Prime Video, which like Netflix, started off offering content from others before moving into their own original productions.

Amazon even attempted to put out audio commentaries on original content – but the only title that I can think of is Transparent – and only season 1. Up until Disney+’s launch, no other subscription-based video streaming service offers extra content like deleted scenes, featurettes or audio commentaries like Disney+ offers.

Disney+’s USP (unique selling point) #1

Featurettes – deleted scenes, audio commentaries and BTS documentaries.

Comparing Disney content I’ve purchased via iTunes and on Blu-Ray, the number of featurettes across Disney movies on Disney+ vary. The newer titles feature audio commentaries, though for something like Black Panther which streams in UltraHD (but can only be purchased in iTunes in HD or SD), you only get a handful for extra features – no commentaries, whereas the iTunes edition, features a full audio commentary from director Ryan Coogler.

There are other titles like this – the original Star Wars trilogy, for example, which offers audio commentaries on the iTunes editions, but NOT on Disney+. This disparity means that you still have to buy titles (at a lower resolution, no less) to get all the features. Disney+ is no Criterion Collection. But it could be. It could be. For fans of films, like me, that like to deconstruct movies and see what makes them tick, audio commentaries and featurettes are a staple of movie watching.

But I dislike double dipping, and I dislike having to “own” lower quality material. My beef against Amazon which streams Good Omens in UltraHD but doesn’t offer the physical discs in UltraHD but does feature audio commentaries is still very much a thing. Also: why couldn’t Amazon or BBC Studios make the audio commentaries on Good Omens available via iTunes or Amazon Prime?

Disney+’s USP (unique selling point) #2

The number of available titles.

Disney+’s back catalogue is HUGE. Practically (but not quite) every movie ever released, every cartoon, every TV series, is here. And it’s integrated some of the Fox content it acquired when Disney took over 20th Century Fox a year ago (or so). So that means 30 series of The Simpsons. James Cameron’s Avatar. And interestingly, the movie versions of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, Prince Caspian (which I worked on), and when Disney (at the time) didn’t want to continue spending money on the franchise, Fox bought it and made The Voyage of the Dawn Treader – which has now come back to Disney as part of its acquisition.

Star Wars fan?

Disney+ has every film, modern TV show (it’d have been nice to have seen the Nelvana-produced Ewoks and Droids that I remember from the 1980’s, but I’m guessing Disney doesn’t own them and can’t license them for the service) with the exception of Rise of Skywalker, which is due to be released digitally on the 13th April. There’s a LOT of stuff here I’ve not seen, so it’s going to keep me occupied for quite some time.

The biggest addition, however, is the first ever Star Wars live-action TV series: The Mandalorian, featuring the world’s least best kept secret: Baby Yoda (that’s not his real name, of course, it’s actually Raymond Luxury Yacht). You just know that merchandising is going to through the roof. But this is a TV show that is a technological marvel and apparently damn entertaining to boot. So I’m very much looking forward to that.

Marvel fan?

Again, Disney’s acquisitions have paid off in spades. Here we have practically every film and TV show set in the Marvel universe – with the exception being Spiderman, since Sony are clinging on to the rights for dear life.

Lots of titles presented in UltraHD, and some of them even have audio commentaries! Keep it up, Disney, keep it up!

Pixar fan?

I count Pixar alongside Studio Ghibli and Walt Disney Animation to be the finest animation studios in the world (okay, and Laika Studios and Aardman Animation). Netflix currently has the majority of Studio Ghibi titles on their service, but if you want Pixar – you’ve got the lot. All of it. Including the short films. Again, there is so much here to enjoy and the entire back catalogue of Pixar films are here to enjoy at any time.

So much Disney, it hurts

There is something for everyone here. Absolutely everything. Disney+ is by far the best streaming service I’ve used. It’s well laid out, and on the Apple TV, it performs very well. And logging in was a breeze. I actually set up my account on my 2018 iPad Pro first. When it came to logging in via the Apple TV, I just had to approve the login on the iPad:

And on the iPad:

Sky Q

As I’m also a subscriber to Sky, we get the app on the Sky Q box. However, it is nowhere near as polished as the tvOS/iPadOS/iOS apps. It doesn’t integrate with the rest of the system unlike Netflix, whereas on the Apple ecosystem, it integrates with the Apple TV app and provides a single catalogue of TV and films across Prime Video, BBC iPlayer, Disney+, Channel 5, All 4, etc. – but not Netflix because they’re total spoilsports.

Additionally logging into your Disney+ account on Sky Q box is a poorly thought out, pain in the arse. You’ll need to use your remote control to enter each character of your email address and password. If you use a strong password (generated by a password manager), this is an absolute massive arse ache. It’s as if the app’s User Interface designer just gave up.

Then there’s the lack of UltraHD content. tvOS features content in UltraHD – the Sky Q app (Sky Q is UltraHD capable, as is the Netflix app on it) does not offer any Disney+ content in UltraHD.

I suspect the deal between Comcast (who now own Sky) and Disney was a late one, and the app was somewhat rushed out the door – but it’s a poor performing app. It’s very slow navigating the many options available to you, and combined with the lack of integration and UltraHD makes it a poor cousin to other platforms which Disney+ is available. Maybe in time this will improve – it’s got to – but for now I’d recommend pretty much anything other than the Sky Q app.

Disney+ rating (taking into account cost, catalogue and overall performance based on the tvOS app):

10/10

Dear Apple,

Please can we use third party Bluetooth mice with pre-boot MacBook/MacBook Pros encrypted with FileVault. I’m not happy that only Magic Mouse mice work during this part of the boot process.

Last year I posted a blog which expressed my frustrations with the system recovery process and non-Apple Bluetooth mice. Even with the Logitech Master 2S hooked up via USB, System Recovery would have none of it. That’s when I had to fork out £55 for the Apple Magic Mouse.

Performing system recovery circa 2019 (pre-macOS Catalina)

Speaking of pre-boot problems, the 2019 MacBook Pro 16″ appears to have issues with Apple’s own (external Bluetooth) Magic Keyboard during pre-boot. When I go to enter my account password to unlock FileVault, more often than not, some key presses aren’t registered in the input form. I have to press them multiple times to get them to register. Sometimes it’s so bad, I have to open the laptop lid to fully expose the built in keyboard and enter it there. That’s works okay – but I’d rather use the external keyboard wherever possible if I’m hooking the machine up to my external monitor. I’m pretty sure my 2018 15″ MacBook Pro didn’t suffer from this problem. Maybe macOS 10.15.4 will resolve the problem?

Now that the new 2020 iPad Pro has launched alongside a new folio case sporting a full size keyboard and trackpad (an additional £300 on top of the iPad Pro itself, BTW) – what exactly is Apple going to be doing with the MacBook and MacBook Pro lines?

Here’s Apple’s TV ad for the new 2020 iPad Pro:

This also brings up whether the MacBook/MacBook Pro range will be moving over to Apple’s ARM-based A-series chips. Would there be any point now if the iPad Pro is just getting more and more powerful and supports trackpad and Bluetooth pointing devices?

I’d still say that if Apple moves to custom-processors for the MacBook/MacBook Pro and iMac ranges – they’re likely to be AMD-based Zen 2 architecture combining the CPU and GPU on the same silicon. This would retain the x86 compatibility that a lot of us sysadmins require, along with better performance and power usage over Intel’s processors.

That’s not the time. That’s how much money you’ve spent on the Apple ecosystem so far.

Meanwhile, Apple has also launched a new MacBook Air with 10th generation Intel processors – available with a quad core Core i7 – which is exceptional for a device that slim.

So again – what’s happening with the various brands? I realise there are some pretty fundamental differences with macOS and iPadOS – but ultimately will the iPad Pro ever run macOS and combine iPadOS features? For the price of the cover which contains the keyboard and trackpad (I still cannot get over the cost – £300!), you can buy a reasonable PC laptop for not much more money.

This is perhaps the most appropriate headline regarding that £300 keyboard and trackpad (click the image to go to the article):

I generally love the Apple Magic Mouse 2 with its gesture based touch surface (scrolling sideways has never been easier), but when it runs out of battery and you need to charge it – well, you’d better have a backup.

Thankfully I do, because about a year or so ago I bought a mechanical keyboard and gaming mouse – similar what I was using at home – for work when I was using a Dell laptop rather than the Mac Mini that I use now. I still have that mouse, and it’s being put to good use while the Apple mouse has a little rest..

Apple mouse on its back while the Corsair takes over

As my readers are aware, I recently sold my 2018 15″ MacBook Pro (2.6Ghz, 6-core i7, 16Gb RAM, 1Tb SSD) to make away for the 2019 16″ MacBook Pro (2.3Ghz, 8-core, 32Gb RAM, 4Tb SSD). I sold it to a work colleague for what I think is a decent buyer’s price – especially when you consider it also came with over a year of AppleCare remaining.

What is interesting is that my colleague lives in another country, and there was some initial confusion with the AppleCare team in Ireland as to whether it would be valid there. At first I was told yes, then no. But that was okay – the machine was in good working order – had lasted me a full year without any problems whatsoever, and we agreed that if it did go wrong, I’d sort it out here in the UK.

Three weeks later, I hear from the colleague to say that he spotted a dead pixel. Fair enough – I usually use the MacBook Pro with the lid closed, external keyboard and mouse, an external monitor, and the machine always plugged into the mains.

So he took it to an Authorised Apple Reseller in his country and they both noticed that the machine wasn’t sitting flush on its rubber legs. It turns out the battery had swollen too, and was pushing the aluminium case out of shape.

And the very nice people at the Authorised Apple Reseller replaced the whole screen, the touch-bar, the keyboard and trackpad, battery and bottom of the machine. For free. The AppleCare warranty WAS valid there. So effectively my colleague has got a 70% new 2018 MacBook Pro (only the main logic-board, SSD and RAM hasn’t been replaced) which should hopefully last him 3-4 years beyond that of the AppleCare warranty (assuming the battery doesn’t swell again – design fault, maybe)?

This kind of makes me a bit worried about my recent purchase – but at the moment there are no known reports of 2019 16″ MacBook Pro batteries swelling up. Given that the keyboard and system internals have been given a complete redesign, maybe that won’t impact the Lithium Ion battery as much? At least I have AppleCare+ on this new Mac in case things do wrong. In fact, I have AppleCare on my iPhone 11 Pro Max and the AirPods Pro because in all the years/decades I’ve been using Apple kit, it’s been well worth it.

But I do wish Apple would do a better job with selling AppleCare+ outside of the US and Canada. For example, paying monthly like the US would be good – the cost of AppleCare+ for this thing is fairly eye watering. And it wasn’t until fair recently that AppleCare+ for Macs was introduced. It didn’t exist back in 2018. And the issue of trying to figure out whether a warranty bought in the UK is valid in another country is a bit of a bugbear too. The parts are all the same – it all ships from China, so I can’t see why the warranty shouldn’t be valid elsewhere where there are valid Apple Stores or Authorised Apple Resellers.

Finally, AppleCare+ would benefit from onsite support as well as having the ability to take it to an Apple Store/AAR. You won’t get any kind of onsite support from Apple unless you have bought hundreds/thousands of machines from them – in which case, you get onsite repairs from IBM. But if you’ve only bought one or two £50k Mac Pros and loaded them to the hilt – you’ve still got to drag them to your nearest Apple Store/AAR for repair. And this is partially why I have never bought another iMac because I don’t want to drag a bloody great machine half away across Surrey to a London Apple Store for repairs. Dell absolutely lead the way here with their next day on-site repairs. And Dell offers 4 year warranties whereas Apple only go to a maximum of three.

But do I still recommend AppleCare/AppleCare+? Yes, absolutely – this is another case where Apple and/or their authorised partners go out their way to fix things. But it’s still a long way from the likes of Dell and other PC manufacturers.

Since Apple started producing its own silicon for the iPhone, the A-series of ARM-based chips has gone from strength to strength. No better device to demonstrate the muscle of the Apple designed SoCs is the iPad Pro. It’s a very capable multitasker – great with media consumption and even pretty decent when it comes to media creation too. But is iOS and iPadOS limiting the series’ potential?

If Apple intends to put their own silicon at the heart of the Mac, it needs to be able to run all current software at the same or better performance than that which is offered on the current Intel platform. Apple has only just released the Mac Pro, a full on Intel-based Mac with up to 28 cores (56 threads) and is a beast (and possibly one of the best design PCs in existence according to several reviews I’ve seen – it’s so clean and manageable inside!). It seems they intend to release a 14″ 10th generation Intel based MacBook Pro at some point this year too.

Yet in the PC world, AMD has the Ryzen 3990X processor with a stupidly insane number of cores: 64 (128 threads) and is an overkill for all but the most intensive applications. For those that need the performance, I don’t think the ARM64 architecture has got to the point where it can compete in that space for a good number of years. Certainly, if Apple were to release a Mac in 2021 with an Apple designed SoC – even if it’s the standard MacBook (not the Pro) model – this means introducing tools to convert existing x86 code to ARM64 and vice versa. Nobody is ever going to run Logic Pro or Final Cut Pro on a simple MacBook, but how powerful does the Apple processor got to be in order to perform the code translation. Or how much work will the developer have to put in to create a universal binary that runs on both platforms? It’s Rosetta all over again.

Then there is the question of Windows. Intel Macs can run Windows natively via Boot Camp. Or via virtualisation within macOS. But if Apple starts moving to ARM processors, this obviously will break that feature – which is very useful for those that develop for both the macOS and Windows platforms.

Microsoft has done some legwork porting Windows to ARM. They’ve even released a Surface Pro laptop (the Surface Pro X) which runs Windows under ARM. But there are so many limitations with the platform which make adoption pretty terrible (and expensive) right now. Apple could potentially update Boot Camp for use with ARM Windows, but until the Windows on ARM platform is sufficiently mature – I don’t think it’s worth it. Even through x86 emulation, it’s not going to be good enough.

Then there are the Thunderbolt 3 ports on current Macs. Dongle city. Thunderbolt is very much an Intel thing, so Apple would still have to continue licensing it from them as well as perform extensive testing to ensure existing peripherals continue to work.

The important thing for me is that Apple doesn’t try to force an iPad-like experience on macOS. If macOS is going to go ARM, I want the macOS experience and to see the performance from applications around the same mark as the Core i9 and AMD Radeon Pro 5500M in my MacBook Pro (which has got to last me 4 -5 years before I can afford another major Apple purchase).

So at what point do you release an ARM-based Mac (if at all)? Difficult to say, but I’d say it’s 2021 would still be far too early. It’s not as though we’ve reached a plateau of power/performance which was certainly the case with the G4 and G5 processors. IBM pretty much forced Apple’s hand, because it just wasn’t possible to put a G5 processor into a laptop.

So maybe Apple should keep ARM to the mobile devices, and switch to AMD for its processors instead. They’ve leapfrogged Intel at an important milestone when it comes to die shrinkage – and, after all, they devised the whole x64 architecture anyway. And AMD must be pretty decent given that both Microsoft and Sony will be using their CPU and GPU technology in the PS5 and Xbox Series X. So any all-AMD Mac/MacBook Pro would be a decent all rounder.

It’s been argued that he x86 architecture is old and out of date – and it has been around for a very long time, this is true. But ultimately it’s allowed those of us with feet both in the Windows/PC world and Mac world the ability to co-operate with each other like never before and do stuff that just wasn’t possible back in the days when Macs where running 68000 or G4/G5 processors.

They say (and rightly so), that you don’t buy a Mac to play games. And yet, how do you explain Apple Arcade – the £4.99/month subscription service from Apple which provides a selection of high quality games (albeit no AAA titles) across iOS, iPadOS, tvOS and macOS devices?

On my old 2018 15″ MacBook Pro, I could play the same games I had on my iPhone on my Mac – and the performance wasn’t too bad. It’s even better on the 2019 16″ MacBook Pro, of course. But Macs weren’t really intended for heavy gaming – this has long been the dominance of games consoles such as the Playstation, Xbox, or the Nintendo Switch. And gaming PCs, of course – Nvidia graphics, quad/hexa/octa-core CPUs with 16Gb+ RAM and superfast SSD drives.

Yet modern Macs have quad/hexa/oca-core CPUs, 16Gb+ RAM and superfast SSD drives. Yet they can’t play AAA titles even if they were ported to macOS. In part this is due to the Nvidia vs AMD graphics. Nvidia has had a long established foothold in the graphics market on PCs – yet AMD’s graphics power the likes of the Xbox and Playstation (and will do with the next generation consoles coming this year).

Nvidia vs AMD

Macs did once have Nvidia GPUs, but due to a long running spat between Apple, Intel and Nvidia, things were never the same. This is not to say AMD produce inferior graphics chipsets – as we’ve seen, they’re used in today’s modern consoles alongside AMD CPUs too. And AMD has just released a 64-core CPU capable of 128 threads. This is a monster of a CPU (with a monster price – $4k for the CPU alone).

But Macs graphics have never been particularly powerful for gaming – primarily because Apple has been concentrating on more professional creative workflows than 3D gaming. And MacBook Pros have been very slender machines which makes designing thermals to keep the machine cooled a bit of a challenge.

Another problem with Macs is that now macOS Catalina has gone fully 64-bit, many 32-bit titles will not work. Goodbye Team Fortress 2 – many a wasted hour spent laughing long and hard playing that game.

But with the 16″ MacBook Pro with an Intel Core i9 processor and an AMD Radeon Pro 5500M with 8Gb of video RAM, I can finally play Fortnite at reasonable framerates. The only downside is that with the release of macOS Catalina 10.15.3, the native Fortnite client takes around 4-5 minutes to load every time. With 10.15.2, it was near instantaneous. Also, with the newer thermal design, the CPU fans will ramp up and it does become quite noisy – so I revert to using headphones.

Nvidia’s GeForce Now – a potential solution to all Mac gamer problems?

Nvidia has a possible solution to the Mac/older PC problem. They have a subscription service which lets you play owned games (including Fortnite) by effectively providing a hosted virtual machine with one of their high end graphics cards. You’re effectively playing the game on their server and streaming the video back to your machine. This relies on:

  • Having a fast connection (50Mbs+ recommended)
  • Using ethernet rather than Wi-Fi
  • Low latency

You also need to own PC games. Fortnite is free to play, so as long as you have your Epic Games credentials, you’re all good. GeForce Now requires that you have logins for the games you’re playing. Nearly all games these days require some form of connection to the internet anyway, so this isn’t so much of a problem. Many of them are available from Steam anyway.

The downside to this is:

  • You’re giving credentials to a third-party service (Nvidia) which stores those credentials on their platform. The logins are usually connected to accounts where credit/debit card details are stored.
  • On a Mac, some symbols are only accessible via the option key – if you have a particularly complex password, good luck trying to enter them via the GeForce Now Mac client. Oh yes, copy and paste between the Mac and the client isn’t supported.
  • Nvidia does not support any form of two-factor authentication on their accounts. This is very bad.

So you’ve got to be very trusting that Nvidia will keep your credentials safe. And you’ll need to ensure that your GeForce Now account’s password is a strong one. Nvidia really need to get their arse into gear and deploy 2FA as soon as they bloody well can. They also need to fix their SPF and DMARC record, because all Nvidia store email goes to spam as a result. This is basic, basic stuff.

Nvidia needs to go back to email school and learn all about SPF and DMARC

Fortnite under GeForce now is very good. Initially it felt as if there was a little bit of lag (latency) when running under the Balanced setting, though it seems to have passed and gaming feels as good as running it locally. As I run my 16″ MBP via an external monitor – it’s limited to 1920×1080 which is a decent setting to run most games on high mode. GeForce Now Fortnite runs well with the high settings enabled and connected to Zen Internet via ethernet at 300Mbs download/50Mbs upload.

Fortnite using Nvidia’s GeForce Now on a Mac. High framerates! (Match sped up x 2)

In terms of loading speeds, GeForce Now and Fortnite are considerably faster than the native macOS Fortnite client. And the Mac’s fans never ramp up at all during gameplay. But I’d ideally still like to play Fortnite natively – if only the loading time issues can be resolved.

Can’t run Team Fortress 2 on macOS Catalina because of 32-bitness? GeForce NOW *can*.

The biggest bugbear is that GeForce Now doesn’t support one of the biggest titles in the past 7 years – Grand Theft Auto V.

GeForce now has two subscription tiers: free, with one hour sessions, and a limited edition Founder’s level which gives longer sessions and priority access (whatever that means). That said, it is £4.99/month with a 90 day trial before your card is charged, which is the cheapest and most generous I’ve seen.

Beware of the Shadows

There are alternatives to Nvidia’s video game streaming. One of them is Shadow. I’ve tried them before. They essentially provide you with a fully virtual Windows PC with Nvidia Geforce graphics card. You’d install games as you would under Windows. Unlike Nvidia’s GeForce Now, you have disk space and, as such, a quota to work with.

The biggest stumbling block I found with Shadow was the latency and overall streaming performance. Despite ethernet or Wi-Fi connection, the lag was very noticeable. And it was extremely expensive for what it is. You’d be better off saving the money towards a console or middle-end gaming PC. Even now, you have pre-order – with some specifications unavailable until 2021.

There’s also Google’s Stadia. Another streaming platform, designed to work across TVs, laptops and tablets. From what I understand you’ll need to buy hardware (at the very least a controller) and a subscription. From what I understand from the web site, you need to buy the games directly from Google to play with Stadia rather than bringing your existing library into it. That kind of limits things somewhat, and makes everything more expensive if you already own titles held on a different platform.

My recommendation

The current range of consoles – especially with Microsoft’s Xbox – are shaping up nicely as a good all round gaming system. Xbox has introduced mouse and keyboard support which when developers take advantage of, give PC-like gaming at a fraction of a cost. The next generation of consoles will also introduce SSDs for storage, which means much faster loading times. It’s also possible to stream from the console to a Mac or PC over local LAN, should you so wish.

But for the Mac user, regardless of whatever model you may be using, a combination of Apple Arcade and GeForce Now may be good option. Providing Nvidia continue to add titles, fix bugs, add essential features (as I mentioned earlier – copying and pasting between environments, and 2FA protection of Nvidia accounts).

There are two devices that I would consider to be Apple’s greatest achievements over the past decade. The first is the Apple Watch, and the second is AirPods. Both have become daily essentials in my battle to get fit and healthier and to pass the time when commuting (especially when South Western Railway/Network Rail implodes).

AirPods are just so damn useful. You can keep them in your jacket or trouser pocket and whip them out (oo-er missus) when you need audio stimulation (oo-er missus). They are a little bit fiddly, yes, and there is the constant danger of dropping them/losing them. But when you need to listen to something in relevant peace and quiet – they’re much better than lugging around normal size headphones.

Beat(s) *THAT* Apple – You Can Do So Much Better

Speaking of normal size headphones, until I bought my first set of AirPods, I’d been using several of Apple’s Beats headphones for a few years – but I can’t say I’ve been terribly impressed. About three years ago I bought the Beats 3 Solo wireless headphones. No Bluetooth audio lag when watching a video, reasonably portable, very comfortable. But when I took them up to Edinburgh, I found I couldn’t charge them. So I took them to the Edinburgh Apple Store and they took them in for repair, and bought a pair of Beats wired headphones to tide me over. But over the past year or so, I can’t say I’m impressed with the earpads of either set of headphones:

Goodness knows how much I’ve got to pay in order to fix the earpads – they don’t appear to be user-replaceable. I’m quite disappointed in Apple here – and as a general opinion of their “extended| warranties, I do wish they’d offer FOUR year AppleCare/AppleCare+ warranties. Dell gives you a choice. Apple do not. In this case, I don’t have any AppleCare with the above headphones, but I DO have them with the AirPod Pros. And I’ve been using the headphones normally (and carefully).

Getting back on track, the one problem with AirPods is that they let in sounds from your current environment, which can make it rather difficult to hear anything unless you crank up the volume. On the iPhone, the volume is limited in a number of ways, but can be overridden:

Until I disabled Sound Check and turned off the Volume limit on the iPhone, listening to audiobooks on the iPhone was noticeably more difficult than with the Apple Watch (yes, you can upload music and audiobooks to an Apple Watch – providing you pair it with Bluetooth headers/speakers). The Apple Watch volume output was much louder and could be heard against a greater range of environmental noises (mainly trains passing through stations).

The AirPods Pro are different in that they introduce noise-cancelling features and a design which fits better inside your ear, creating a better seal, which should help reduce as much as your local environmental sounds as possible. Plus it can also be used as a kind of hearing-aid – using the built-in microphones, it can relay sounds directly to you, which makes it much easier to hear people talking to you/announcements. Whenever you need to be alert. Noise cancellation can be turned off and be used as regular AirPods. Noise cancellation itself is pretty good for an in-ear device. It won’t get rid of sounds completely, but it’s good enough to listen to music and audiobooks without having to have the volume turned up loud.

The AirPods Pro use silicon tips which keep the pods in your ears and comes with two other sizes. They’re easily replaceable (and if you lose them – Apple will sell you a new set for about $4) – just pull them off and push new ones on. I found that I had to use the larger size to get the most comfortable (and most efficient) fit. Big lugholes require big tips. Oo-er missus.

I absolutely love my AirPod Pros, and the wireless charging case makes things even easier (I’m coming from the first generation AirPods which didn’t have any wireless charging). I almost entirely use AirPods/AirPods Pro when on the phone, and at work – when I want to drown other people’s music out and/or concentrate when the office gets a bit too noisy.

They’re a bit more pricey than regular AirPods – but thanks to EE, I’m able to add them to my phone plan and split the cost over 11 months. I’ve just got to be sure NOT to wash the things – which I did when I left my first ever set of AirPods in a trouser pocket once.

As a long term Apple user, I’ve seen a lot happen with Apple’s services division over the past 20 years. When they work, they bring me great joy and they are absolutely worth the money. But when they don’t, they are a bigger pain in the arse than South Western Railways and Network Rail.

Having moved over to the 16″ MacBook Pro, one of the first things I did before the move was:

  • Create a current, up-to-date Time Machine backup
  • Copy all data – including Apple Photos and Apple Music/TV to a separate hard drive and copy them back over manually

iCloudy with a chance of rain

When the new machine was running, I copied all my data back over. The first problem was that because I use iCloud Photo Library, Apple immediately enables it even if you don’t want to use it (a bug, perhaps?) – creating a Photos library catalogue. About 99% of having copied the data from the separate hard drive to the Photos directory on the new Mac terminated and told me there was already data there, and then terminated the transfer.

So I thought I’d give Apple the benefit of the doubt and download all my photos and videos stored in iCloud Photo Library (around ~130Gb) and start a new catalogue from scratch. It did work, but it takes forever for the Apple Photos app in macOS Catalina to do its stuff before downloading can happen. It took about 3-4 hours in total to download 10,443 photos and 463 videos. Speaking of iCloud Photo Library – Apple had better start considering offering a 4Tb tier. I’m nowhere near that level yet, but as storage becomes cheaper on MacBook Pros, iMacs and Mac Pros, and as the cameras improve on iPhones, people will start putting everything in iCloud. Obviously I back everything up religiously to Time Machine, Backblaze, Google Drive and separate hard drives, but as we’ve just discovered – it doesn’t always work out the way you think it does. At least I can access all the old photos from the backups manually.

Ch..ch..ch..changes

What is interesting to note is that with macOS Catalina’s Photos app, Apple has made some internal restructuring to the package contents of the catalogue. No longer is there a masters directory containing your original files and filenames, but a directory called originals which contain the original files. But with Apple-encoded filenames. Original filenames appear to be stored as metadata within an internal, locally-stored Apple database.

Apple Music is just as buggy as iTunes

With regards to Apple Music, I originally didn’t have any problems copying that across. The only real issue is that the artwork to albums and playlists was missing. I tried everything I could to try and get them back through the Apple Music app on Catalina, but no joy. The closest I got was to nuke everything in the Music directory and copy back over from the Time Machine backup. They seemed to work – except that every single file was available to download through iCloud. Downloading only doubled the amount of space being used by macOS.

So I completely deleted my Music directory again and tried to get Apple Music to start afresh. Except it didn’t. It picked up my account details and some album artwork straight away. And iCloud Errors galore.

At one point, Apple Music got REALLY confused.

So I did a bit of digging around. There aren’t many articles about Apple Music on Catalina and how to fix problems. But this is how I “fixed” mine – where “fixed” was to get Apple Music to start from scratch – newly created directory, no files downloaded, all music stored in iCloud – then start to download music as an when needed. Over 56,000 tracks is a bit much.

I hate Windows registry, but Apple’s Library can just as bad…

Having closed Apple Music and deleted the Music subdirectory from within the Music directory in my home directory, I opened a terminal, I navigated to

~/Library/Caches

and nuked any files or directories that mention iTunes or Music in their file/directory names. This gets rid of any caches built up by Apple Music/iTunes. So it should forget anything you’ve done so far. But this isn’t enough. I then changed to:

~/Library/Preferences

and nuked any files or directories that mention iTunes or Music in the file/directory names. From there I fired up Apple Music and was greeted by the Apple Music welcome screen. And everything worked as expected from that point onwards. I downloaded my playlist music just fine, along with a number of albums. All good. And everything has been fine for the past 24 hours.

More internal local changes

Again, with macOS Catalina, Apple has re-arranged the internal file structure for Apple Music. My backups had an iTunes directory with all the media stored in there, and a Music directory which had a single package file within it. When starting Apple Music anew, there is a Music subdirectory containing the same package, followed by a media directory.

Within the Media subdirectory, you can see that (when arranged alphabetically) Apple Music files are stored separately from purchased/uploaded music.

When attempting to get things working from backup, it seemed Apple Music was completely confused. I’ve got to say, Apple, that you’ve made a right pig’s ear of this and I’m not happy. When I’ve set-up Apple Music on my work Mac, it was fine because I hadn’t any existing files. But if I had brought them in, I’m sure I’d suffer similar problems.

What is the point of backups if they don’t work properly – especially if the issue is being caused by bugs or changes made by the same company you’ve bought the hardware AND software from?

macOS Catalina – a steaming pile of horse poop

Regardless of whether its new hardware or existing hardware, the macOS Catalina experience has been awful. My work Mac Mini (2018) was bricked by the update and required a logic board replacement. The 2018 MacBook Pro was fine, but clearly the backups I’ve been making haven’t been suitable for transferring to a new machine – or even to the same machine because of all the changes between Mojave and Catalina.

A while back, I spoke to some people from a VERY big international games company, and the problems they were having with Catalina were numerous. Don’t forget that Catalina drops support for 32-bit apps. And many of them are games.

There are so many game titles which are all 32-bit, and not compatible with macOS Catalina, making Steam for macOS pretty redundant right now. At least there’s Apple Arcade, right?

I do love my 16″ MacBook Pro, but I want to see Apple seriously step up their services/macOS game because right now it’s simply not good enough.